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KINU White Paper on Human Rights in North Korea 2021 
Date : November 25, 2021
White Paper on Human Rights in North Korea 2021Part Ⅰ Purpose of Publication and Research MethodologyPart Ⅱ The Reality of Civil and Political RightsPart Ⅲ The Reality of Economic, Social and Cultural RightsPart Ⅳ Vulnerable GroupsPartⅤ Major Issues
Letter of Special Rapporteurs to the DPRK 
Date : September 1, 2021
Mandates of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea: the Special Rapporteur on the right to education; and the Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of slavery, including its causes and consequences REFERENCE: ALPRK4/202129 June 2021
A Human Rights-based Approach to the SDGs in the DPRK 
Date : August 30, 2021
A Human Rights-based Approach to the SDGs in the DPRK: Focusing on vulnerable groups and calling for collective efforts in times of COVID-19The report revealed the myriad ways that vulnerable groups in the DPRK, particularly persons with disabilities, women and children, experience daily exploitation and abuse. Critically, the report found that these human rights violations occur in spite of the fact that the DPRK government claims to have legal frameworks in place to protect the rights of these groups. Yet, for the citizens of the DPRK, having such laws that are not enforced is the same as not having the laws at all. Even worse, many of the violations described in the report, such as the exploitation of children as farm and construction laborers, occur as a direct result of the DPRK’s policies to advance its rural and overall economic development. Without meaningful protections for human rights at the heart of development policies, such abuse is inevitable.  
A Policy of Public Diplomacy with North Korea 
Date : August 9, 2021
A Policy of Public Diplomacy with North KoreaA Principled and Pragmatic Approach to Promote Human Rights and Pursue DenuclearizationAuthor: Jieun Baek | August 2021AcknowledgementsBetween April and July of this year, our working group engaged in robust discussions with the singular goal of recommending a pragmatic, solutions-oriented policy on North Korea to the Biden administration. The recommendations in this report are derived from the collective and varied experiences and insights of the US-NK Policy Working Group. Our working group members—some of whom have analyzed and observed North Korea since 1979—include former U.S. Army and U.S. Navy officers with extensive experience in security affairs on the Korean peninsula, retired U.S. intelligence community analysts, academics, and human rights NGO leaders. Our birth places include the U.S., South Korea, North Korea, and Romania. Two of our members secretly listened to American and other foreign radio programs in Romania and North Korea before eventually settling in the United States. ......[Source: Belfer Center, Harvard Kennedy School]
APPG: Inquiry into Human Rights Violations in North Korea 
Date : July 21, 2021
APPG on North KoreaInquiry into Human Rights Violations in North Korea 2014-2020/1The APPG on North Korea conducted an inquiry into the human rights violations in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK)between  2014  and  2020/1(the  Inquiry).  The  purpose  of  this inquiry  was  to  gather  evidence  of  human  rights  violations  between  2014  and  2020/1,  to  map  the atrocities, and to identify the needed responses. The Inquiry consisted of desktop research, open public consultation, and oral hearings. It builds on the work of previous reports on North Korea’s human rights situation, particularly theUN’s2014 Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea(the UN Commission of Inquiry), and renews calls for action
DPRK VNR on the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda 
Date : July 14, 2021
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Voluntary National Review On the Implementation of the 2030 AgendaPrepared by the Government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in consultation with National Partners in the Democratic People’s Republic of KoreaJune 2021
Promoting accountability in the DPRK 
Date : February 3, 2021
Promoting accountability in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human RightsHuman Rights CouncilForty-sixth session 22 February–19 March 2021 SummarySubmitted pursuant  to  Human  Rights  Council  resolution  40/20,  the  present  report describes the activities of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in promoting accountability for human rights violations in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, highlighting the progress made and the challenges encountered. It also examines information the Office has gathered on human rights violations committed in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in the light of relevant international legal standards. It concludes with recommendations addressed to the Government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Member States, the  Human Rights Council and the General  Assembly and all stakeholders.United Nations
HRW: Worth Less Than an Animal 
Date : October 19, 2020
“Worth Less Than an Animal”Abuses and Due Process Violations in Pretrial Detention in North KoreaIn late 2014, police officers entered the home of Lim Ok Kyung, a smuggler in her forties from North Korea’s South Hwanghae province. The police were looking for, and found, home appliances smuggled from China. Lim Ok Kyung was detained at a detention and interrogation facility (kuryujang) run by the police near the border. Her husband, a mid-level party member, had good connections, so she was released after 10 days. Yet that did not prevent the investigator or police guards from beating her. Lim Ok Kyung described her experience to Human Rights Watch:  ......[Source: Human Rights Watch]
Report of the SR on the situation of human rights in the DPRK 
Date : October 15, 2020
Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of KoreaA report by UN Human Rights expert Tomás Ojea Quintana on the human rights situation in the DPRK in the context of COVID19 outbreak and progress made towards peace on the Korean Peninsula. Summary The present report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic  People’s  Republic  of  Korea  is  submitted  pursuant  to  General  Assembly resolution  74/166.  In  the  report,  the  mandate  holder  provides  an  overview  of  recent developments in the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in the context of the threat of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak as well as progress made towards peace, security and denuclearization on the Korean Peninsula. The report updates the international community on issues of concern regarding the situation of human rights and reiterates the importance of engagement with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
Laying the human rights foundations for peace 
Date : October 15, 2020
Laying the human rights foundations for peaceSupporting an inclusive and human rights-centred peace process in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Laying the human rights foundations for peaceDiscussion paper, September 2020[Source: United Nations Office of High Commissioner for Human Rights (Seoul)]
North Korean Phone Money 
Date : September 18, 2020
North Korean Phone Money: Airtime Transfers as a Precursor to Mobile Payment SystemBy Yonho KimNorth  Korea’s  rhetoric  has  increasingly  emphasized  economic  development  since  Kim  Jong  Un  took  power  in  2011.  After  declaring  completion  of  the  state  nuclear  force  in  his  2018  New  Year’s address, Kim announced in April 2018 a “new strategic line” that shifted from the paral-lel (byungjin) policy of pursuing both economic growth and nuclear weapons to concentrating on the economy.1 Furthermore, fully aware of the failure of the inconsistent market policies of his father and predecessor, Kim Il Sung, Kim has shown greater tolerance for market activities and introduced some economic reform measures, including increased managerial latitude for state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and farmers’ limited right to sell excess output at market prices. ....[Source: UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEAC]
UNSG report on the human rights situation in NK 
Date : September 11, 2020
U.N. Secretary-General’s report on the human rights situation in the DPRKThis report provides an update to the United Nations General Assembly on the human rights situation in the DPRK over the past year.  It includes the situation of human rights in the context of COVID-19, and the challenges the pandemic poses to people’s access to food, water and healthcare.  It presents an update on the situation of people in places of detention, as well as developments in respect of fundamental freedoms, freedom of movement, the right to work, separated families and international abductions.  The report also illustrates an overview of the DPRK’s engagement with the United Nations human rights system over the past year.  It ends with the Secretary-General’s conclusions, and a list of recommendations to the DPRK Government and the international community on steps needed to improve the human rights situation in the DPRK.  
Laying the human rights foundations for peace 
Date : September 8, 2020
Laying the human rights foundations for peace: Supporting an inclusive and human rights-centred peace process in the Democratic People’s Republic of KoreaThis paper was presented today at the Korea Global Peace Forum[Source: United Nations Office of High Commissioner for Human Rights (Seoul)]
How North Korean Businessmen Busted Sanctions in Congo 
Date : August 21, 2020
OVERT AFFAIRSHow North Korean Businessmen Busted Sanctions in the Democratic Republic of CongoIn 2018, two North Korean businessmen formed a construction services firm in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and engaged in activities that appear to violate sanctions adopted by the European Union (EU), the United Nations, and the United States. Despite strict international prohibitions, these individuals opened a bank account for their company, Congo Aconde, and undertook construction projects in the country. One such project involved erecting statues in a remote provincial capital, a type of construction explicitly forbidden by UN sanctions adopted in 2016. In another apparent violation of UN sanctions, Congolese government funds reportedly served to pay for the statues. Notably, Congo Aconde’s activities also gained the attention of several prominent Congolese politicians linked to former President Joseph Kabila’s political party, and some of these politicians even rubbed shoulders with the North Korean businessmen. .......[Source: Sentry]
UN report-I still feel the pain 
Date : July 28, 2020
Women forcibly returned to North Korea suffer appalling violations in detention – UN report GENEVA / SEOUL (28 July 2020) – Women detained in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) are subjected to multiple and serious human rights violations by State security and police officials according to a UN human rights report published on Tuesday.The report is based on 100 first-hand accounts by North Korean women who were detained in the DPRK from 2009 to 2019 after being forcibly returned. These women, who eventually managed to escape the DPRK, gave detailed interviews to UN Human Rights staff.Although traveling abroad is effectively prohibited in the DPRK, women embark on dangerous journeys looking for life-saving sources of income or a new life abroad. They often fall into the hands of human traffickers, ending up as cheap bonded labour or exploited sexually, and, at times, forced into marriage. Upon their return to the DPRK, these women are detained by the Ministry of State Security or the Ministry of People’s Security. They are often sentenced to imprisonment by State officials without a trial, or after proceedings that do not meet international norms and…
 
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